Showing posts with label Learning Strategies. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Learning Strategies. Show all posts

Wednesday, 4 April 2018

"Flipping" Student Learning

Educational research indicates that deep learning takes place when there is “interplay between the cognitive, interpersonal and intrapersonal skills” (National Research Council, July 2012, p.2). This approach was evident in a recent Grade 10 Canadian History class, as students used “flip debates” to develop a position on the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
The class began with students using appropriate documents and working in small teams to become familiar with the fact patterns related to this historical event. This team work enabled students to develop such important interpersonal skills as communication and perspective.
 
Students were then instructed to work with their team to develop a position as to whether the bombing should have taken place. Doing so enables students to think and reason about an important moral issue. Teachers then placed teams with opposing viewpoints on the issue into one group and instructed the group to examine the “flip” side of their position. Ultimately, the team had to reach a consensus on the topic. Adding this step to the process forces students to think carefully and debate both sides of the issues in order to reach a carefully considered point of view.
 
Having students write about what they learned through the “flip debate” is an excellent intrapersonal activity, as it allows them to assess how their initial position on the issue evolved.

Monday, 27 November 2017

Supporting Self-Directed Learning


Giving students opportunities to self-direct their learning within the classroom is a tremendous way to enhance student engagement and confidence.
Most of our high school math classes use an approach that allows students some choice in how they learn. Students can work individually using an online lesson prepared by Greenwood teachers or in small groups.

Some of our math classes are co-taught, which means there are two teachers in the room. This approach allows students to get direct instruction from one teacher, while the other teacher facilitates group learning. This approach is effective, as students use class time efficiently and learn in a way that meets their individual needs.


According to our students, having input into how you learn makes learning engaging. Our alumni tell us that this approach equips them with the high level of independence required to succeed in postsecondary studies.


  

Thursday, 15 December 2016

Building Skills and Confidence in the Student Success Centre

The Student Success Centre hosts our Learning Strategies classes, and is also open to all
students before and after school and at lunch.

Located on the second floor, Greenwood’s warm, welcoming Student Success Centre helps students build confidence and develop new learning skills.

In addition to hosting our Learning Strategies courses, the Success Centre is open to all students before and after school and during lunchtime. A variety of spaces, including breakout rooms, quiet study areas and bar seating, allow students to select the right work environment for them.

“In our Learning Strategies classes, some students work best in small groups, while others want to work independently or have a one-on-one meeting with their teacher,” says Jennifer Lillie, Director, Student Success. “The new Centre meets all of these different needs.”


"With the glass walls, students can always see their peers and teachers working, and it
encourages them to do the same," says Jennifer Lillie, Director, Student Success.


The Success Centre is very popular with students, and two teachers are always on hand at busy times to ensure students have the support they need, whether it be study skills, organizational tips or time-management strategies.

“The space is very inviting,” Jennifer says. “With the glass walls, students can always see their peers and teachers working, and it encourages them to do the same.”

Ultimately, the Success Centre helps students to gain a greater understanding of how they learn, and to apply that knowledge both in and out of the classroom.


A variety of spaces, including breakout rooms, quiet study areas and bar seating,
allow students to select the right work environment for them.